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The Best Men's Hiking Shoes of 2017

The Ultra 109 GTX set the highest bar for performance overall.
By Ross Robinson ⋅ Senior Review Editor
Sunday
Ready to hit the trails? We can help find the best hiking shoes for your feet. We researched 55+ models from top manufacturers and tested the 10 best for three months. Crossing the Sierras in California and Nevada, our experts hiked hundreds of miles of varied terrain and conditions to push the limits of these shoes. We considered the key aspects of hiking footwear performance, designing tests to discover which ones maintain traction on sloppy trails, how well they support medium loads, and which shoes keep feet fresh for miles. Comparing these models side-by-side, we gained a comprehensive view of their performance to pass onto you. Whether you are seeking a fast pair, the best bargain, or the most versatile shoes, your search ends here.

Best Do-It-All Hiking Shoe


The North Face Ultra 109 GTX


The North Face Ultra 109 GTX
Editors' Choice Award

$110.00
at Amazon
See It

All-around performance
Superior traction
Low weight
Average durability
Absorbant mesh upper
Claiming victory of our hiking shoes review in 2017 is The North Face Ultra 109 GTX. For three consecutive reviews, no model tops this shoe's versatile capabilities. It's the best model available on the market today. Weighing under two pounds, it's one of the lightest shoes reviewed, yet provides sufficient support and stability for backpacking trips with a medium load. Its proprietary outsole bites into all types of terrain well and swallows rough terrain without blinking. Our feet remained fresh inside these shoes for miles and miles. Its ability to switch between long hikes and trail running makes it an excellent choice if you want to do both, and for trips with a single pair of shoes, this is the one.

Read Full Review: The North Face Ultra 109 GTX

Best Bang for the Buck


Vasque Juxt


Best Buy Award

$87.99
at Amazon
See It

Low weight and high breathability
Ideal for dry climates
Awesome price for a great shoe
Not for wet environments
Vulnerable stitching
This year's Best Buy Award goes to the Vasque Juxt for impressing us on so many levels, yet it costs less than all but one other model reviewed. This shoe is comfortable on flat and rough terrain, features an excellent lacing system, and has a full leather upper without weighing a lot. Its traction on solid ground and loose gravel is exemplary, too. Its main drawback is that it doesn't have a waterproof liner, and therefore ill-suited for wet conditions. The majority of hiking is done under dry skies, though, and for that, this shoe fits the bill.

Read Full Review: Vasque Juxt

Top Pick for Aggressive Hiking


Salomon X Ultra 2 GTX


Salomon X Ultra Low II GTX
Top Pick Award

$144.95
at Amazon
See It

Excellent all-around traction
Waterproof
Performs well on all trails
Unique lacing system not everyone's favorite
Not our favorite for carrying heavy loads
The Salomon X Ultra 2 GTX didn't take long to impress us from the bottom up. The stiffer-than-most outsole with aggressive lugs make for excellent purchase on nearly any surface, and we expect the rubber to hold up much longer than the softer soles of most other contenders. Weighing 2 lbs 1.5 oz and sporting a more narrow feel and fit than the Editors' Choice winner from The North Face, this model is ready to scurry downhill trails or speed through the flats. Your hikes might turn into runs with these shoes. Some might not like the diversion from traditional laces, but we enjoyed the convenience of the Quicklace system and had no problems with it. The North Face model beats out the X Ultra 2 GTX when it comes to extended trips with medium to heavy loads. But if slowing down isn't an option for you, this is your shoe. Looking for a little more ankle support? Check out the $165 Salomon X Ultra Mid 2 GTX for the same great performance with more ankle protection.

Read full review: Salomon X Ultra 2 GTX

Top Pick for Comfort


HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP


HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP Low
Top Pick Award

$159.95
at Backcountry
See It

Unrivaled comfort
Supportive
Lightweight and breathable leather
Sub-par traction
Modest durability
Expensive
Lace up the HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP and kiss tired and sore feet goodbye. This uber-comfy model has the thickest and cushiest soles by far. It's also one of the stiffest in the midfoot and provides excellent torsional stability. This combination of comfort and support makes it a great choice for most day hiking ventures and short backpacking trips. It's lightweight, barely tipping our scales past two pounds, and its eVent membrane is waterproof and breathable. Its durability and traction aren't the best, but for easy to moderate trails (which most trails are), these shoes are adequate and friendly on the feet. Not only suited for the trails, folks who spend most days on their feet, or anyone who wants to lower the impact on their knees and back, will enjoy wearing this pair.

Read Full Review: HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP

Great for Long Distance Support


Keen Targhee II



Superior support
Robust toe protection
Roomy toe box great for downhill
Lacing system cinches heel fit
Heavy
Leaked during testing
Too wide for some folks
The Keen Targhee II was a Best Buy Award winner in our past review, and continues to be a great hiking shoe with a strong following in the hiking world. Backpackers enjoy the unrivaled support provided by these low-cut shoes, and strong-footed thru-hikers often choose them for multi-week treks. This shoe is also comfortable and protects feet well in rough terrain. It's not the most versatile shoe due to its bulky shape and heaviness, and it did leak after a few minutes of our waterproof test. However, for slogging out miles for days on end while carrying a load, this is our favorite model. If you prefer a mid-cut boot, the Keen Targhee II Mid took home the Best Buy Award in our hiking boots review.

Read Full Review: Keen Targhee II

up to 5 products
Score Product Price Our Take
83
The North Face Ultra 109 GTX $120
Editors' Choice Award
Considering the top notch performance this pair provides, we're stoked our favorite model is also less expensive than most, too.
78
Salomon X Ultra 2 GTX $145
Top Pick Award
Charge down any and all trails in this aggressive hiker with a non-traditional lacing system.
78
HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP $160
Top Pick Award
If supreme comfort is your only consideration, this is your best match.
74
Adidas Terrex Swift R GTX $135
The lightest and most playful in our review, this athletic shoe is versatile for hikes, runs, and gym sessions.
73
Vasque Juxt $110
Best Buy Award
This model offers great hiking performance at a low price for folks in dry climates.
66
La Sportiva Synthesis Mid GTX $185
This is a solid choice for fast hikers in wet climates with moderate trails.
66
Keen Targhee II $125
Backpackers will enjoy the support offered by this tried and true classic.
63
Merrell Moab 2 Waterproof $120
A popular model that provides solid performance on easy to moderate trails, as well as in chilly weather.
60
Asolo Agent GV $185
Durable and sensitive underfoot, this expensive model isn't for aggressive hiking but does look good.
52
Columbia Redmond $90
We are inclined to recommend this shoe more for yard work than pounding out miles on a trail.

Analysis and Test Results


Throughout a three-month testing period, we wore these shoes on hundreds of miles of hikes, walks, and jaunts across town. We hit all difficulties of trails and continued hiking where there were none, too. Detailed notes were recorded on performance on each outing and we used these experiences to score each model in seven unique rating metrics. Furthermore, we designed specific trials and tests for the contenders to further investigate performance capabilities between the pairs, even wearing a different shoe on each foot to compare models. The rating table above displays the combined scores from the weighted individual metrics. In the analysis below we share our findings on each rating metric and the top scorers in each.

The 2017 contenders in all their glory.  The back row (from the left): Vasque Juxt  HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP  La Sportiva Synthesis Mid GTX  The North Face Ultra 109 GTX  Keen Targhee II. The front row: Columbia Redmond  Merrell Moab 2  Salomon X Ultra 2 GTX  Adidas Terrex Swift R GTX  Asolo Agent GV.
The 2017 contenders in all their glory. The back row (from the left): Vasque Juxt, HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit WP, La Sportiva Synthesis Mid GTX, The North Face Ultra 109 GTX, Keen Targhee II. The front row: Columbia Redmond, Merrell Moab 2, Salomon X Ultra 2 GTX, Adidas Terrex Swift R GTX, Asolo Agent GV.

Comfort


Comfort is king in the world of hiking shoes. Whether you're spending hours or weeks on the trail, nothing is more important for enjoying your on-foot adventures than happy feet. Many factors influence comfort: the amount of padding in the upper, how well the shoe fits your foot when correctly sized, and how the lacing system adjusts fit. Other factors include foot protection across rough terrain, breathability, and shock absorption.


We took extensive notes on the comfort-effecting features of each shoe. We considered the padding in the upper and in the tongue, checked the feeling when laced and standing, and how long the break-in period was if any. We walked on flat and rough trails in each to see how well they handle each, noting any soreness or tiredness our feet developed. The roominess of the toe boxes, arch support, rockered soles, and overall protection were all scrutinized as well.

Out of sight  out of mind. We liked the easy stowing of the laces in the elastic tongue pocket.
Out of sight, out of mind. We liked the easy stowing of the laces in the elastic tongue pocket.

Lacing systems have a large effect on comfort, and so we examined how they each work and the ease or difficulty of fine-tuning the fit. We enjoyed the ease and high functionality of speed lacing systems that require no knot-tying, as found on the Salomon, Adidas, and La Sportiva models. To test shock absorption in each model, we jumped down off a boulder onto a flat rock landing and noted how much impact was felt in our feet and knees.

The Redmonds look pretty sweet in this photo  but extended hiking on uneven surfaces and rocks results in sore feet inside this shoe.
The Redmonds look pretty sweet in this photo, but extended hiking on uneven surfaces and rocks results in sore feet inside this shoe.

Finally, we looked at how well each model breathes. Dry feet are comfortable feet, and a good design keeps feet dry when splashing through puddles and breathes well on warmer days. We took each model to the local gym to walk on a treadmill at the same speed (3 mph), same incline (moderate), and for the same distance (1 mile) in the same socks (no fear, we cleaned them between trials). Afterward, we noted how hot our feet were, then removed the shoes to check for sock dampness and sweat accumulation on our feet. The results were varied, and the only product without a waterproof membrane, the Vasque Juxt, turned out to breathe the best, as we expected. Of the shoes with waterproof membranes, the Columbia Redmond breathes the most.

Shock absorption testing in the Tor Summit.
Shock absorption testing in the Tor Summit.

The Tor Summit ticked the most boxes in the comfort department. The sole is extra thick with varying densities, which absorbs impact and uneven surfaces without batting a lace eyelet. They kept our feet comfortable and fresh, even under the weight of a medium pack over several miles and on long descents. Comfort is important on the trails, and it's important to remember that a shoe's comfort depends on a good fit.

The lightweight Terrex Swift blurs the arbitrary line between a heavy trail runner and light hiker.
The lightweight Terrex Swift blurs the arbitrary line between a heavy trail runner and light hiker.


Weight


Light is right for footwear. Lifting an additional half pound with each step is noticeable as the miles pass. Choosing the lightest footwear with enough stability for your ankles and feet are a top consideration. Hiking shoes fit a sweet spot between boots and trail runners; boots are heavier but provide better ankle stability, and trail runners are lighter but aren't as durable or supportive of the foot.


To ensure accuracy in our comparison, we weighed each of the models we tested, all size 11.5s, on a digital scale. Each was weighed with the insoles and laces supplied by the manufacturer straight out of the box. The Adidas Terrex Swift R GTX and Columbia Redmond Waterproof are the lightest pairs tested, weighing 1 lb. 13.6 oz. and 1 lb. 14.1 oz., respectively. The North Face model also came in under two pounds. The heaviest model tested is the Keen Targhee II, which translates to more stability.

When the stakes are high and losing your footing means getting drenched in a cold mountain stream  you want solid traction underfoot.
When the stakes are high and losing your footing means getting drenched in a cold mountain stream, you want solid traction underfoot.

Traction


When hiking, confidence that our foot will stay put with every step is valuable. Traction relies on the design and material composition of the outsole. Vibram soles are popular, and their carbon rubber soles covered the bottoms of four of the contenders in this review. We were surprised, however, that several manufacturers are turning to proprietary outsoles for their hiking shoes, some of which provided the best traction overall. Regardless of who made the outsole, each hiker in this review has a unique sole shape and tread pattern of lugs. This reflects the obvious fact that there is no single answer for great traction on every possible surface. While all models proved capable walking across smooth, dry dirt trails, the differences shone through in trickier terrain. From thick mud to slushy snow to rock slabs to loose sand and gravel, we tested these shoes over surfaces encountered when hiking.


Each model was tested side-by-side on five separate surface types to come up with the shoes' overall traction score. We often wore different shoes on each foot when trekking through the test areas in order to have direct comparisons in their purchase ability. First, we walked up and down dry granite slabs. Most models performed well in these scenarios, while the Targhee II, Moab 2, and Agent GV stuck best to the steepest slopes. All three pairs have lugs that allow for lots of surface area contact. In our wet rock test, we walked back and forth across the same wet rocks in mountain brooks and streams. The Terrex Swift R GTX gave us the most confidence when crossing wet granite.

Side-by-side traction testing with the Adidas model on the left foot and the Vasque shoe on the right foot.
Side-by-side traction testing with the Adidas model on the left foot and the Vasque shoe on the right foot.

We also hustled up slopes of loose sediment in our traction tests, in which the more aggressive tread of the Salomon and The North Face models dug in better than the rest. On the eastern side of the Sierras in Spring, we found a trail covered in mud from the thawing snow. Again, the deep and multi-directional lugs of the Salomon X Ultra cut through the mud most efficiently, finding undercover rocks or more stable soil to gain purchase. We also preferred the shoes with heel brakes when descending loose and sloppy terrain, keeping us from sliding out much better than the outsoles without it.

Oops! We sank in over our cuffs while testing traction on muddy surfaces. Here is the Ultra 109 GTX on the left and the Terrex Swift on the right.
Oops! We sank in over our cuffs while testing traction on muddy surfaces. Here is the Ultra 109 GTX on the left and the Terrex Swift on the right.

Matching shoes to your most common trail conditions helps you achieve the most out of your outsoles. Consider the ground you hike most often and check out the individual reviews which highlight how each model performed on every type of surface tested.

Trailside boulders are just too tempting to resist. If this speaks to you  aim for a shoe with good traction on dry rock like this Vasque model.
Trailside boulders are just too tempting to resist. If this speaks to you, aim for a shoe with good traction on dry rock like this Vasque model.

Finally, we walked up and down some gentle snow-covered slopes warmed into a slushy state by the midday sun. The Salomon and North Face models kicked in steps in the snow the best going up. Coming down, we again fell for outsoles with heel brakes which tended to catch a sliding foot well. The La Sportiva Synthesis Mid GTX also did well in the snow. On top of our specifically designed tests, we also factored our experiences on and off trail while hiking into the traction score.

Even on rough and chossy terrain  the Ultra 109 GTX pulled through with great foot support and stability.
Even on rough and chossy terrain, the Ultra 109 GTX pulled through with great foot support and stability.

Support


How much support a shoe provides is based on several factors, including the thickness and materials of the midsole, thickness of the outsole, the shape of the last, and, to a lesser extent, the insole. An ideal hiking shoe is stiff from heel to midfoot but flexible up front. Most models reviewed included a shank between the midsole and outsole, which increases stiffness and protects over rough terrain. Stability is also a factor, which is influenced by forefoot width and the height of the ankle collar.


If ankle protection and support is a key concern for you, consider a pair of hiking boots.

To investigate stiffness underfoot, we tested the lateral torsion of each model. Solid torsional support reduces the risk of injury in uneven terrain and when carrying a load. Holding the front of the shoe in one hand and the heel in the other, we twisted the shoe, similar to wringing out a towel. The more resistant a shoe was to twisting indicated greater rigidity in the sole. This rigidity improves a shoe's support when moving through talus and rough terrain, or scrambling and hopping boulders. The Keen Targhee II and HOKA ONE ONE Tor Summit are the stiffest in a group of contenders that varies widely in this aspect. The Columbia Redmond and La Sportiva models are much less rigid and therefore less supportive. We were pleased that all products reviewed flexed sufficiently in the forefoot.

Good foot support is appreciated on trails littered with rocks and obstacles.
Good foot support is appreciated on trails littered with rocks and obstacles.

We also measured the forefoot at its widest point on each product. Wide bases provide a stable foundation for powering through each step. The HOKA ONE ONE, Merrell, and The North Face models tied for the widest forefoot at 4.75 inches. We also measured the height of the ankle collar (from the footbed to the highest ankle point) to check ankle stability. While ankle protection is more of a thing with hiking boots, we still appreciate a pair of hiking shoes that offers more stability than a typical trail runner. The La Sportiva model crept up our ankles the highest at 4.125 inches.

The Synthesis Mid GTX carried us through the boulder fields for a weekend around Bishop  CA without minding 10-15 pounds of crash pad  climbing shoes  water  and lunch on our backs.
The Synthesis Mid GTX carried us through the boulder fields for a weekend around Bishop, CA without minding 10-15 pounds of crash pad, climbing shoes, water, and lunch on our backs.

Lastly, we also considered the quality of the insole. It appears that some manufacturers view the insole as just an opportunity to add cushioning and improve the fit of the footbed. We appreciated manufacturers that took the insole as an opportunity to add support to the heel and midfoot. The stiffest insole award goes to the Keen's, while the Salomon, Vasque, and Merrell products also beefed up their insoles by adding second, more dense layer of foam to the back half of the foot. This extra support did not take away from comfort in the footbed in any case. While many hikers see buying third-party insoles as automatic, hiking shoes are not cheap, and we like insoles that aren't, too.

The insoles. Top row (from the left): HOKA ONE ONE  La Sportiva  Adidas  The North Face  Asolo. Bottom row: Vasque  Salomon  Keen  Merrell  Columbia.
The insoles. Top row (from the left): HOKA ONE ONE, La Sportiva, Adidas, The North Face, Asolo. Bottom row: Vasque, Salomon, Keen, Merrell, Columbia.

Overall, the Targhee II proved the most supportive of the bunch and a great choice for backpacking, featuring great torsional stability with a flexible forefoot, a solid forefoot width, and our favorite insole for support. Following close behind were the North Face and HOKA ONE ONE models, which have thick, supportive midsoles. The Redmond scored the lowest in this category. We were able to wring the shoe in our torsional stability test, thin midsoles, and its below-average ankle collar height and forefoot width didn't stack up to the stability of the other shoes. The La Sportiva model also lacked midsole support in under the foot arch and was too flexible in the midfoot.

Downward slope? Don't mind if I do speed on when wearing the Ultra 109 GTX.
Downward slope? Don't mind if I do speed on when wearing the Ultra 109 GTX.

Versatility


How many things can one pair do? Several considerations went into versatility scores. Some of these shoes are comfortable on flat trails and rough terrain, and some handle moderate loads without wincing. We value a shoe that is comfortable for short day hikes and also supportive enough for light backpacking trips.


Do you want one do-it-all shoe or a quiver of options for different adventures? If you are new to hiking, it's likely that a versatile, do-everything shoe fits your needs. But, if you have specific priorities and a bigger budget, two or more pairs of specialized shoes could give you focused performance. Keep in mind that a shoe designed for hiking is only part of your adventure footwear quiver, which might already include boots and trail running shoes.

The high ankle collar and waterproof upper of the Synthesis Mid GTX make a great combination for strapping into snowshoes.
The high ankle collar and waterproof upper of the Synthesis Mid GTX make a great combination for strapping into snowshoes.

At a bare minimum, a product in this category must handle several miles with a light daypack stuffed with a water bottle, snacks, an extra layer, and a camera. All models passed this low standard. During testing, we also packed a midsize pack with 15-20 pounds and hit the trails in the contenders. After a few miles, the pack separated. Our favorites for moderate backpacking trips are the Keen Targhee II and The North Face models, which have great ankle and foot support.

We tested each shoe with a medium load over several miles to assess each model's ability on backpacking trips. The Agent GV  shown here  wasn't our first choice for backpacking.
We tested each shoe with a medium load over several miles to assess each model's ability on backpacking trips. The Agent GV, shown here, wasn't our first choice for backpacking.

Out on the trail, we ran a few miles with a light pack in each pair. Fastpacking adventures are fun and growing in popularity, and we wanted to know which models were up to the task. This trend is reflected in the market, as many hikers available look like beefed up trail runners. Several shoes in this review felt natural at a running gait, but none combined nimble running ability with powerful support better than the Salomon X Ultra. We also appreciate hiking shoes that don't scream "I went hiking today!" when worn casually. The Asolo Agent GV and Vasque Juxt did the best job blending in around town. Hiking shoes usually don't come in a plethora of color options, but most models in this review have a few different colors to choose from.


Stomping through puddles is a simple pleasure in the Ultra 109 GTX  which has a Gore-Tex waterproof liner.
Stomping through puddles is a simple pleasure in the Ultra 109 GTX, which has a Gore-Tex waterproof liner.

Water Resistance


It's no secret dry feet provide more comfort and warmth than wet ones. Moisture and water in the footbed also increase the likelihood of blisters. The trade off for solid waterproofing is lower breathability, warmer feet, and a higher price tag. Nine of the ten shoes reviewed have a waterproof membrane, with the outlier being the Vasque Juxt. We chose the waterproof versions because the average hiker encounters wet conditions often, from water crossings to muck and slush to precipitation and more. Of those with membranes, the Keen and Columbia models incorporate proprietary membranes, KEEN.DRY and Omni-Tech, respectively. The other waterproof models featured some type of Gore-Tex or eVent waterproof breathable membranes.


Most manufacturers produce waterproof and non-waterproof versions of their hiking shoes. If you don't need the protection, the non-waterproof versions are almost always cooler, more breathable, and cost less.

To score the contenders in this metric, we considered their individual flood heights, how readily the upper absorbs water, and performance in our waterproof challenge. After a couple months of hiking, we headed to a small mountain stream in the Eastern Sierras. Checking for leaks, we splashed around in water deep enough to cover the forefoot. We walked around and flexed the forefoot in order see if the added stress induced leakage. After five minutes, we removed the shoes to see if any water made it inside.

Not only did the Adidas model pass our waterproof test  its synthetic upper resisted absorbing water well  too.
Not only did the Adidas model pass our waterproof test, its synthetic upper resisted absorbing water well, too.

The Salomon X Ultra 2 emerged from the water on top of all other models. It has the tallest flood height (4.75 in.), kept our feet dry through the waterproof test, and resisted absorbing water into its leather and synthetic upper. Similar water resistance effectiveness came from the La Sportiva, Adidas, and The North Face models, passing the waterproof test but having lower flood heights. Any water these models did soak up dried quickly.

The X Ultra 2 GTX is the closest to a fish in water  receiving the highest score in our water resistance metric.
The X Ultra 2 GTX is the closest to a fish in water, receiving the highest score in our water resistance metric.

A few seconds after stepping into the water in the Juxt, our feet were soaked. Not having a waterproof membrane, this was expected, and we only put them through this liquid suffering for equality's sake. Two shoes with waterproof membranes, however, did leak — both the Keen Targhee II and the Merrell Moab 2 Waterproof. Our feet remained dry for a few minutes in both, but they couldn't survive the full five minutes underwater. The Keen leaked more than the Merrell, while the Merrell absorbed more liquid into its mesh-heavy upper. Water resistance declines with use and time, but we expected more from these two models after 15-20 miles on each pair.

Post waterproof test results: The Moab 2 leaked.
Post waterproof test results: The Moab 2 leaked.

All of these shoes benefit from a leather or fabric conditioner applied to the upper. Nikwax has a range of products that are great for treating the mixed material uppers of these shoes. A leather or fabric treatment keeps water from soaking the shoe's upper materials. Even when water is stopped by the waterproof liner, it makes your shoe heavy and hinders breathability. The La Sportiva, Salomon, Adidas, and Asolo products soaked up the least water and dried faster than the others.

If heavy dew and water crossings are common where you hike, consider choosing a dark color option for your shoes. This allows them to dry quickly when it's sunny.

The Agent GV has superior construction and materials  combining for a very durable shoe.
The Agent GV has superior construction and materials, combining for a very durable shoe.

Durability


The are many trade-offs when designing hiking footwear, and the opportunity cost for a durable shoe is commonly more weight. A focus on making lightweight, comfortable shoes means that durability is less of a focus. Full leather uppers tend to be more durable than synthetics, but also weigh more. Rubber-covered toe boxes also increase durability in that high-wear area, yet again add to the shoe's weight. Durable, dense rubber soles are also heavier than softer rubber. Your hiking shoes take more punishment than any other kind of hiking gear you wear, making craftsmanship, materials, and design an important part of choosing a pair that ages well.


While we didn't test the entire lifespan of each product, we put a minimum of 15 to 20 miles on each shoe and checked them at the end of the testing period for any signs of weakness or wear. Inspecting each shoe, we looked at protection in high wear areas, rubber density of the sole, materials and construction of the upper, quality of stitching, and other unique characteristics of each shoe. We also read online reviews and talked to fellow hikers on the trails about their shoe experiences ("Hey, how do you like your Merrells?").

The exposed stitching on the heel is vulnerable to damage when scraping against rocks.
The exposed stitching on the heel is vulnerable to damage when scraping against rocks.

The Asolo Agent GV proved to be the most durable shoe in our review. It features excellent toe protection, a durable suede leather upper, a stiff PU insert, and overall quality construction from sole to stitches. It barely showed any signs of the abuse we put it through after three months. On the other side of the spectrum are the Redmond and Synthesis Mid GTX. Both shoes exhibited poor durability, with ripping mesh and toe cap peeling, respectively, after a few months of use. Both shoes have poor toe protection, an area of high abuse, and lack dense rubber outsoles to withstand rough trails.

Review author Ross Robinson takes advantage of a free water source to clean off the Moab 2 after mud traction tests.
Review author Ross Robinson takes advantage of a free water source to clean off the Moab 2 after mud traction tests.

Cleaning and treating your footwear increases its life expectancy. Mud and sand left on the shoe's upper create premature wear. Warm water and a soft brush are your best tactic for cleaning. Nikwax offers a line of leather and fabric conditioners, including products for suede leather and synthetic fabrics. Common wear areas, like the flex points on the forefoot and seams that are prone to scuffing, can be reinforced. Applying Gear Aid Seam Grip or a similar sealer keeps out dirt and sand, prolong use, and has the added benefit of keeping water out.

Do yourself a favor and visit the Care and Feeding section of our hiking boot review for more information on cleaning, treating and extending the life of hiking footwear.

Wherever your feet lead you  we want you to have the best shoes for the task. Happy feet  happy hiking  happy souls!
Wherever your feet lead you, we want you to have the best shoes for the task. Happy feet, happy hiking, happy souls!

Conclusion


The variety of hiking footwear for outdoor folks these days is a blessing. With high traction, comfy soles and waterproof uppers that support the foot while freeing your ankle, hiking shoes are the choice of many hikers today. We designed this review to be comprehensive in its scope and detailed in its testing in order to help you get on the trails with the ideal footwear for your hiking style. But you may need the support and ankle stability that a boot provides, or even enjoy pushing the capabilities of light trail running shoes. We cover the best uses and defining attributes of these types of outdoor footwear above, and delve into the fine details in our Buying Advice article, where fitting and sizing is also detailed.

Ross Robinson
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